United Airlines Flight 1953 From PDX To IAH, Boeing 737-900

United Airlines Flight 1953 From PDX To IAH, Boeing 737-900

This is a video from a flight on United Airlines Flight 1953 from Portland, Oregon to Houston, Texas on January 27, 2016. This video shows the takeoff from Portland and the landing in Houston. Highlights include a great view of Mt Hood while leaving Portland and the buzz of the General Electric CFM56-7B24 turbofan engines during the takeoff. Details: United Airlines Flight 1953 from Portland (PDX) to Houston (IAH) Aircraft: Boeing 737-900 Date: January 27, 2016 Seat: 10A This was taken with a GoPro Hero 4 Black, video resolution 1080, 60FPS, Medium FOV, Protune On

Flight Training: Wingovers and Chandelles 1953 US Navy Training Film; SNJ Trainer Aircraft

Flight Training: Wingovers and Chandelles 1953 US Navy Training Film; SNJ Trainer Aircraft

Pilot Training Playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA6387BA013F9A4D more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html Wingovers and Chandelles demonstrated on a US Navy SNJ trainer aircraft (aka North American T-6 Texan or Harvard). 6th in a series of 9 pilot training films. US Navy Training Film MN-7398-F Public domain film from the US Navy, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_T-6_Texan The North American Aviation T-6 Texan is a single-engined advanced trainer aircraft used to train pilots of the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), United States Navy, Royal Air Force and other air forces of the British Commonwealth during World War II and into the 1970s. Designed by North American Aviation, the T-6 is known by a variety of designations depending on the model and operating air force. The United States Army Air Corps (USAAC) and USAAF designated it as the AT-6, the United States Navy the SNJ, and British Commonwealth air forces, the Harvard, the name it is best known by outside of the US. After 1962, US forces designated it the T-6. It remains a popular warbird aircraft used for airshow demonstrations and static displays. It has also been used many times to simulate various Japanese aircraft including the Mitsubishi A6M Zero in movies depicting World War II in the Pacific... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wingover A wingover (also called a wing-over-wing, crop-duster turn or box-canyon turn) is an aerobatic maneuver in which an airplane makes a steep climb, followed by a vertical flat-turn (the plane turns to its side, without rolling, similar to the way a car turns). The maneuver ends with a short dive as the plane gently levels out, flying in the opposite direction from which the maneuver began... A wingover is a maneuver used in aerobatics, in which the aircraft makes a tight, 180 degree change in heading while covering the shortest amount of distance possible. The maneuver begins by making roughly a quarter loop, bringing the plane up into a vertical or near-vertical climb, allowing the airspeed to drop. Before the airplane stalls (begins to fall) the pilot applies hard rudder input, bringing the plane into a sweeping, vertical flat-turn, during which the wing swings over the top of the turn toward the direction of the nose. Both the lowered airspeed and gravity provide assistance with the turn, similar to a stall turn (hammerhead turn), except the plane never actually stalls. Instead, as the speed decreases, the plane makes a gentle, 180 degree flat-turn over the top of the climb, then dives to the original altitude along a parallel flightpath, completing a quarter loop to return to level flight at the original speed. The wingover is an energy-management maneuver. It is often used in dogfighting as an alternative to the split-s, when a fast turn-around is needed but a loss in altitude and a change in airspeed is not. Because the aircraft does not roll, it also has the advantage of keeping the cockpit facing the same direction during the turn, allowing the pilot to maintain sight of the opponent. Wingover-type maneuvers are often used to abruptly end other climbing maneuvers, like chandelles and high Yo-Yos, "kicking over" the nose when the enemy shows signs of falling or trying to dive away... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandelle The chandelle is an aircraft control maneuver where the pilot combines a 180° turn with a climb. It is now required for attaining a commercial flight certificate in many countries. The Federal Aviation Administration in the United States requires such training. The chandelle (which is the French word for candle) is a precision aircraft control maneuver, and not strictly speaking an aerobatic, dogfighting, or aerial combat maneuver. It is rather a maneuver designed to show the pilot's proficiency in controlling the aircraft while performing a minimum radius climbing turn at a constant rate of turn (expressed usually in degrees per second) through a 180° change of heading, arriving at the new reciprocal heading at an airspeed in the "slow-flight" regime, very near the aerodynamic stall. The aircraft can be flown in "slow-flight" after establishing the new heading, or normal cruise flight may be resumed, depending upon the purposes of the exercise or examination...

Flying with Arthur Godfrey - 1953 Airlines & Passenger Planes in America - WDTVLIVE42

Flying with Arthur Godfrey - 1953 Airlines & Passenger Planes in America - WDTVLIVE42

TV host Arthur Godfrey takes controls of an Eastern Air Lines passenger plane to show us "behind the scenes' of a 1950's American airline company. WDTVLIVE42 - Transport, technology, and general interest movies from the past - newsreels, documentaries & publicity films from my archives.

Aerobee Rocket Launches Monkeys & Mice: "ANIMALS IN ROCKET FLIGHT" 1953 USAF

Aerobee Rocket Launches Monkeys & Mice: "ANIMALS IN ROCKET FLIGHT" 1953 USAF

more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ "Preparation of monkeys and white mice for flight in the Aerobee Missile at Holloman AFB, 1952." The Aerobee sounding rocket 2nd stage engine was also used in the 2nd stage of the Vanguard launch vehicle. "AEROMEDICAL EXPERIMENTS SHOW EFFECTS OF ROCKET TRAVEL ON MONKEYS AND MICE." NEW VERSION with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hR6ue-NS-M Public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization (the resulting sound, though far from perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://history.nasa.gov/printFriendly/animals.html ...On June 11, 1948, a V-2 Blossom launched into space from White Sands, New Mexico carrying Albert I, a rhesus monkey. Lack of fanfare and documentation made Albert an unsung hero of animal astronauts. On June 14, 1949, a second V-2 flight carrying a live Air Force Aeromedical Laboratory monkey, Albert II, attained an altitude of 83 miles. The monkey died on impact. On August 31, 1948, another V-2 was launched and carried an unanaesthetized mouse that was photographed in flight and survived impact. On December 12, 1949, the last V-2 monkey flight was launched at White Sands. Albert IV, a rhesus monkey attached to monitoring instruments, was the payload. It was a successful flight, with no ill effects on the monkey until impact, when it died. In May 1950, the last of the five Aeromedical Laboratory V-2 launches (known as the Albert Series) carried a mouse that was photographed in flight and survived impact. On September 20, 1951, a monkey named Yorick and 11 mice were recovered after an Aerobee missile flight of 236,000 feet at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico. Yorick got a fair amount of press as the first monkey to live through a space flight. On May 22, 1952, two Philippine monkeys, Patricia and Mike, were enclosed in an Aerobee nose section at Holloman Air Force Base. Patricia was placed in a seated position and Mike in a prone position to determine differences in the effects of rapid acceleration. Fired 36 miles up at a speed of 2000 mph, these two monkeys were the first primates to reach such a high altitude. Also on this flight were two white mice, Mildred and Albert. They were inside a slowly rotating drum where they could "float" during the period of weightlessness. The section containing the animals was recovered safely from the upper atmosphere by parachute. Patricia died of natural causes about two years later and Mike died in 1967, both at the National Zoological Park in Washington, DC. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerobee The Aerobee rocket was a small (8 m) unguided suborbital sounding rocket used for high atmospheric and cosmic radiation research in the United States in the 1950s. It was built by Aerojet General. The company began work in 1946 and test fired the first complete Aerobee from the White Sands Proving Grounds in New Mexico on 1947-11-24. It reached an altitude of 34.7 miles (55.8 km). The rocket was two stage with a solid-fuel boost and a nitric acid/aniline sustainer. The rockets could reach around 230 km (a later variant exceeded 400 km). Instrumentation usually provided constant telemetry and was recovered by parachute. For accurate pointing special gimbal mounts were developed...

Flight Training: Crosswind Approaches, Landings and Take-Offs 1953 US Navy Pilot Training Film; SNJ

Flight Training: Crosswind Approaches, Landings and Take-Offs 1953 US Navy Pilot Training Film; SNJ

Pilot Training Playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA6387BA013F9A4D more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html Crosswind take-offs, approaches and landings demonstrated on a US Navy SNJ trainer aircraft (aka North American T-6 Texan or Harvard). 3rd in a series of 9 pilot training films. US Navy Training Film MN-7398-C Public domain film from the US Navy, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_T-6_Texan The North American Aviation T-6 Texan is a single-engined advanced trainer aircraft used to train pilots of the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), United States Navy, Royal Air Force and other air forces of the British Commonwealth during World War II and into the 1970s. Designed by North American Aviation, the T-6 is known by a variety of designations depending on the model and operating air force. The United States Army Air Corps (USAAC) and USAAF designated it as the AT-6, the United States Navy the SNJ, and British Commonwealth air forces, the Harvard, the name it is best known by outside of the US. After 1962, US forces designated it the T-6. It remains a popular warbird aircraft used for airshow demonstrations and static displays. It has also been used many times to simulate various Japanese aircraft including the Mitsubishi A6M Zero in movies depicting World War II in the Pacific... T-6s remained in service, mainly as a result of the United Nations arms embargo against South Africa's Apartheid policies, with the South African Air Force as a basic trainer until 1995. They were replaced by Pilatus PC-7MkII turboprop trainers... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilot_certification_in_the_United_States Pilot certification in the United States is required for an individual to act as a pilot of an aircraft. It is regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), a branch of the Department of Transportation (DOT). A pilot is certified under the authority of Parts 61 and (if training was conducted by an FAA-approved school) 141 of Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, also known as the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs). An FAA-issued pilot certificate is evidence that an individual is duly authorized to exercise piloting privileges. The pilot certificate is one of several kinds of airman certificates issued by the FAA... Pilot training Most pilots in the U.S. undergo flight training as private individuals with a flight instructor, who may be employed by a flight school. Those who have decided on aviation as a career often begin with an undergraduate aviation-based education. Some pilots are trained in the armed forces, and are issued with civilian certificates based on their military record. Others are trained directly by airlines. The pilot may choose to be trained under Part 61 or Part 141 of the FARs. Part 141 requires that a certified flight school provide an approved, structured course of training, which includes a specified number of hours of ground training (for example, 35 hours for Private Pilot in an airplane). Part 61 sets out a list of knowledge and experience requirements... Knowledge tests Most pilot certificates and ratings require the applicant to pass a knowledge test, also called the written test. The knowledge test results are valid for a period of 2 years, and are usually a prerequisite for practical tests. Resources available to prepare for the knowledge test may be obtained from pilot supply stores or vendors. The exceptions where a knowledge exam is not required for a practical test are for some add-on ratings after the initial license... In order to take knowledge tests for all pilot certificates and ratings, the applicant must have a sign-off from a ground or flight instructor... Practical tests All pilots certificates and ratings require a practical test, usually called a "check ride". For each practical test, the FAA has published a Practical Test Standards document which is expected to be used by the applicant to prepare, by the flight instructor to teach and evaluate readiness for the exam, and by the examiner to conduct the exam. A practical test is administered by an FAA Inspector or an FAA Designated Pilot Examiner. The check-ride is divided into two parts: the oral exam followed by a flight test in the aircraft... As of the end of 2011, in the US, there were an estimated 617,128 active certificated pilots. This number has been declining gradually over the past several decades, down from a high of over 827,000 pilots in 1980. There were 702,659 in 1990 and 625,581 in 2000.

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