Squadron Signal PzKpfw 38(t) in action book review

Squadron Signal PzKpfw 38(t) in action book review

A quick review video of a new In Action book from Squadron Signal, PzKpfw 38(t) hardcover book. Books can be found on Squadron's website, http://www.squadron.com/Default.asp Like us on Facebook, http://www.facebook.com/EastCoastArmory http://eastcoastarmory.com

F4U Corsair In Action

F4U Corsair In Action

F4U Corsair in Action (SC) - Squadron Signal Books - SS10220 http://www.squadron.com/F4U-Corsair-in-Action-Squadron-Signal-SS10220-p/ss10220.htm Updated and expanded with 53 exciting new photographs in 16 all new, additional pages. Bringing to mind the exploits of 'Pappy' Boyington and his 'Blacksheep Squadron' and Tommy Blackburn with the 'Jolly Rogers,' the Corsair is among the most formidable US fighters of World War II. The F4U maintained a kill ratio of 11:1 according to the United States Navy and went on to serve American forces in Korea, holding its own in the early years of the jet age. The Corsair was first conceived as a high-speed, high-altitude fighter for the Navy in 1938 when Chance Vought's design team drew up plans for a fighter with a 1,800 hp engine and a huge 13-foot propeller. The Corsair's famous inverted gull wing design was introduced to allow prop clearance. Handling problems delayed the aircraft's deployment aboard carriers, but Marine Corps pilots quickly took to the powerful, rugged fighter and VMF-124, the first Marine squadron to fly the Corsair in combat, also produced the first Corsair air ace, Kenneth A. Walsh, by the summer of 1943. A total of 12,571 Corsairs were built between 1940 and 1952, most of them by Vought, but hundreds by Goodyear and Brewster as those companies' assembly lines had to be pressed into service to meet soaring demand for the remarkable aircraft. This exhaustive volume surveys the history of the Corsair from its first prototype to the restored warbirds that have continued to delight air show audiences down to the present day. Illustrated with 229 photographs, plus color profiles and detailed line drawings; 80 pages. http://www.squadron.com/F4U-Corsair-in-Action-Squadron-Signal-SS50220-p/ss50220.htm #F4U #Corsair #Squadron #book #US #fighter #WorldWarII #WWII #WW2 #war #combat #Navy #Marines #USMC #Korea #PappyBoyington #BlacksheepSquadron #JollyRogers #ChanceVought #InvertedGullWing #Goodyear #Brewster #warbird

B-25 Mitchell Walk Around

B-25 Mitchell Walk Around

B-25 Mitchell Walk Around (SC) - Squadron Signal - SS25071 http://www.squadron.com/B-25-Mitchell-Walk-Around-SC-Squadron-Signal-p/ss25071.htm Soaring into the pages of history with Jimmy Doolittle's famed Tokyo Raiders, the North American B-25 Mitchell was the most-produced American medium bomber of World War II. Profusely illustrated, this volume examines the nuances of the external features and explores the inner workings of the B-25D model, the scarce hard-hitting, cannon-armed B-25H, and also the most abundantly-produced Mitchell, the B-25J. Enhancing the color photographs, taken both on the ground and in the air, four vintage black-and-white images and 14 line drawings further illustrate details, while five color renderings of aircraft and markings provide a glimpse at the nature of the crews. Illustrated with more than 200 photographs; 80 pages.

A-20 Havoc In Action

A-20 Havoc In Action

A-20 Havoc In Action - SS10238 http://www.squadron.com/A-20-Havoc-In-Action-Squadron-Signal-SS10238-p/ss10238.htm The Douglas A-20 Havoc was a light bomber, attack, and intruder aircraft of World War II. Used by the American Army Air Forces, nearly one-third of the aircraft served with the Soviet military, while many other A-20s fought with the RAF. Taking its first operational shape on the eve of the outbreak of the war in Europe, the 7B prototype actually crashed with a French observer aboard, kicking off a scandal in still-isolationist America where military aircraft were not to be exported. U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt pressed for a change in that restrictive rule and the French, impressed by the plane’s rugged dependability and maneuverability, proceeded to place orders for 100 of the aircraft, albeit with modifications that resulted in the DB-7 version. Even before shipments began in November 1939, Paris had increased its order by another 170 aircraft. Many of those, however, found their way into the British RAF, which flew them under the nickname “Boston,” after the fall of France in June 1940. The U.S. Army Air Corps issued its first contracts for the aircraft they called the A-20 and A-20A, in May 1939, these were only delivered during the months from late 1940 through much of 1941. A dozen A-20As had recently arrived in Pearl Harbor when the Japanese surprise attack destroyed two of them on the ground. Modifications of the design continued and it was after the U.S. entry into the war when the A-20C version, produced by Douglas and Boeing, first were accepted. Of the first 515 A-20Cs, 108 were retained by the U.S. Army Air Forces, while 407 were shipped off to the Soviet Union. Numerous versions of the aircraft followed. About half of the A-20G were sent to the Soviet Union, as were many of the A-20H. In fact the Soviet air forces had more A-20s than the USAAF. Illustrated with 192 vintage photographs and detailed line drawings. 80 pages.

216 Parachute Signal Squadron Op HERRICK IV Part 1

216 Parachute Signal Squadron Op HERRICK IV Part 1

216 Parachute Signal Squadron Op HERRICK IV in Afghanistan working with 3 Para in the RLDs

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