DIY 3KW Solar Part 3 SDG&E Stealing Power

DIY 3KW Solar   Part 3   SDG&E Stealing Power

Did a quick test on my temporary, small, TEST Grid Tie Solar system to see if the rumors I had heard to true. Do smart meters actually CHARGE YOU for providing power to the power company? They sure DO! Watch me run the test. SDG&E is stealing power then selling it to your neighbors if you produce more than you use! Don't fret, you can call SDG&E and request a NEM Capable meter, but really? WTF? UPDATE: Wow... I got a lot of trolling hate emails from a few that admitted they were 'In the industry'. Well, first a foremost: "Cry me a river." They are irked because I decided to do my install myself instead of paying for their markups. Second, they like to point out that (as I admit in the initial description) that I don't have an NEM agreement in place so why would I be upset because I didn't get credit? Answer: I'm not. I could care less that they didn't give me credit. I understand that an NEM agreement has to be in place to get credit for excess energy. I'm cool with that. Here is my gripe: They made me pay for the energy, then resold it to my neighbors. That's all. Is it a lot of money? No. A big deal in the big scheme of things? Nope.. Just a bit unethical I say. Why don't they just make the meter refuse to give credit until an agreement is in place? Hell, we would be helping the poor 'overtaxed' grid. Anyhow... Enough rant. Take this video for whatever you want to do with it. In short, I could care less that I didn't get my credit.

What Is Net Metering?

What Is Net Metering?

Net Energy Metering (NEM) is a credit on your electric bill that represents the full retail value of electricity delivered by your solar electric system. This means when your solar panels are producing more energy than your home is consuming, your surplus power will flow onto the grid and help power the rest of your community. As your electricity flows onto the grid, you earn a credit which is used when you consume more energy than your panels are producing (e.g. at night, when it’s raining, etc.). Net metering allows solar to be a viable energy option because our power demand is not perfectly aligned with solar production. Pick My Solar was founded on the idea that clarity and transparency was important in the solar industry. By creating an online marketplace for homeowners, Pick My Solar is able to drive down the costs of solar while still providing the homeowner with a customized solar system from the best installers in their area. It is our mission to simplify the process of going solar, drive down costs, and provide the consumer advocacy necessary for solar to achieve broad market success. Click here for instant cost and savings estimates. Check out our bid generator: https://pickmysolar.com/app/bid-generator. Be sure to visit https://pickmysolar.com for more information and subscribe above to get notified whenever we post a new video! Follow us! Twitter: https://twitter.com/pickmysolar Facebook: https://facebook.com/PickMySolar Instagram: https://instagram.com/pickmysolar Google+: https://plus.google.com/+Pickmysolar1

Aggregated Net Metering for Ag - CalCom Solar

Aggregated Net Metering for Ag - CalCom Solar

How can California agriculture operations use solar power to take advantage of PG&E's Net Energy Metering Aggregation (NEMA) program (Aggregated Net Metering programs by SCE / other utilities)? Discover how NEMA accelerates solar ROI and helps avoid crop displacement by using a single, centralized solar array to feed multiple meters/service points.

Q&A - NEM Bills- Annual vs. Monthly Payments

Q&A - NEM Bills- Annual vs. Monthly Payments

Solar net metering explained

Solar net metering explained

http://www.epho.com.au What is net metering and what does it mean for system owners? ePho is a commercial solar power specialist with a strength in system design, quality components, quality installations and a focus on the lifetime performance of your system. This video is from Bosch Solar in Germany, and I am just adding a brief narration to add some localisation for Australia -- to explain how net metering works here - so it is useful for those of us here in Australia. I'll apologise in advance that the video is of a house, not a factory or a business, but the principle is the same of course. Solar Power in Australia has changed a bit over the last few years and while many states have had a variety of feed in tariffs, what we have almost universally is a net feed in tariff, which is being demonstrated here. The essence of a net feed in tariff is the relationship between your usage, and your solar production. We can see this clearly shown in the two lines being drawn on the graph throughout the day... solar production, and power consumption. There are spikes in consumption as various appliances are used, and there are changes in solar production throughout the day - both in a predictable manner, and also with changes as clouds reduce output temporarily. With net metering, you are still connected to the grid, and you always have this reliable supply from the grid. You are not dependent on solar power for your needs. It merely diminishes the amount of power that you need to import, therefore reducing the amount you are buying, and saving you money. The two systems work hand in hand to supply you with the clean 240v power you need. You don't need to do anything, or switch anything, or change any of your equipment. An analogy is that it is like two rivers flowing into each other, and merging. At times, solar will be a bigger contributor. At other times it will dry up - at night for example. You are not impacted, as your grid connection is stable. There are a few implications of net metering. One is that only the power that is used, as it is being produced, is useful to you. So solar will suit those that have a regular load during sunshine hours. Another implication is that you can't eliminate your bill. You will still pay for power consumed over and above the solar production- if your usage exceeds your production, or when there is no solar production. In some cases, you might be paid for excess solar production -- that is, power produced but not used -- but this is less common on a commercial system. Another implication of net metering is that you don't really want to have a system that means you export a lot of power each day -- otherwise you are investing in a system, merely to export power for a small reward. To learn more, or have a discussion about working out a system size to meet your needs, please visit our web site www.epho.com.au We can carry out a detailed analysis of your usage and demonstrate the financial benefit of solar in what we call the Solar Business Case.

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