How to Fill Out your Income Tax Form 1040

How to Fill Out your Income Tax Form 1040

2015 and 2014 1040 Tax Form Updates: The 2015 1040 Tax form has the same line number and information as the 2014. (the amounts will be different). The purpose of this video is to help you understand what is on the main tax form so you can get ready to fill out your taxes. You can fill out your tax forms by hand or via a computerized program or have an accountant do it for you, but it is helpful to know what is in the tax form. You will usually save money if you " know before you go". 2015 and 2014 Tax form 1040 updates are put in the red bubbles in this video. For 2015 updates or other 2015 tax forms go to http:// www.IRS.gov. The main form that you file when you file your income tax is IRS Form 1040. This video explains how to fill out your tax form and how you can get more tax credits and deductions. The 1040 Tax Form does not change much from year to year. Some changes for 2015 and 2014 are explained in the little bubbles. The Health Insurance topic can be very confusing. Additional changes for 2015 and 2014 are about the new health care law (Affordable Care Act), And how to report and get your tax credit. Health Insurance. There are 3 lines on the 1040 Tax form that refer to the Health Care Law. Line 46 "Excess Advance premium tax credit repayment" Fill out another form (Form 8962) if this applies to you. Line 61 "Health Care: Individual responsibility" and you fill out form 8965 if this applies to you. Most people only have to check the box on line 61 and do not need to fill out the form. Line 69 "Net premium tax credit" If this applies to you then fill out Form 8962. When you use a computerized tax form or service to fill out your taxes then these extra tax forms will automatically pop up for you to fill in. IRS Warning: The IRS reminds individuals who owe the payment that it should be made only with their tax return or in response to a letter from the IRS. The payment should never be made directly to an individual or return preparer. Most people don’t owe the payment at all because they have health coverage or qualify for a coverage exemption. The IRS has received several reports of this kind of unscrupulous activity. In some cases, return preparers have told taxpayers to make the payment directly to them, even though the taxpayer had Medicaid or other health coverage and doesn’t need to make the shared responsibility payment at all. In some parts of the country, unscrupulous return preparers are targeting taxpayers with limited English proficiency and, in particular, those who primarily speak Spanish. These preparers are asking for direct payment to them, but their reasons vary. Methods include: • telling individuals that they must make an individual shared responsibility payment directly to the preparer because of their immigration status, • promising to lower the payment amount if the client pays it directly to the preparer, or • demanding money from individuals who are exempt from the individual shared responsibility payment. From: HCTT-2015-17:

How To Fill Out Form 1040 - Form 1040 Instructions

How To Fill Out Form 1040 - Form 1040 Instructions

How to fill out Form 1040 - Watch this video by a certified public accountant (http://www.evanhcpa.com) to help you understand the flow of the Form 1040 and see how to fill it out. In the video, a CPA based in Nashville (Evan Hutcheson, CPA, LLC, 2303 21st Ave S #201 Nashville, TN 37212) shows you how to fill out form 1040, what each line of the 1040 tax form means and how each line is affected by other lines within the form. The best way for you to file your tax return online is to go to the IRS website and find the 1040 in the free fillable forms. Filling out the form is a simple process and they do a lot of the calculations for you. The Form 1040 is two pages. It is broken up into sections, including income, adjusted gross income, taxes and credits, etc. Each part of the 1040 is affected in different ways by other parts, and there are many variables involved. For example, to calculate tax, you can not just simply multiply your taxable income by your tax rate. Different parts of you income are taxed at different rates. I go into this, and much more, in greater detail in the video, so please have a look at it to find out whether or not you will be able to deduct your rental property losses on your individual tax return. You can find the IRS Form 1040 online here: http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f1040.pdf Please share this video on how to fill out Form 1040: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SG0C5KdeqnE Subscribe to my Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/EvanHutchesonCPA Follow Me: http://www.facebook.com/EvanHutchesonCpa http://twitter.com/Nashville_CPA http://plus.google.com/+Evanhcpa/about http://www.linkedin.com/pub/evan-hutcheson/30/909/746 You might like this video too: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijo-JNPJ6Bg How to Fill Out Form 1040 1040 Instructions Filling Out Form 1040 How to Fill Out the 1040 Tax From

2014 Tax IRS Form 1040 Instructions Help Review

2014 Tax IRS Form 1040 Instructions Help Review

http://www.jmrose.com | (818) 992-5800 or (800) 992-5800 A CPA Firm, J.M.ROSE Certified accountants, business consulting, bookkeeping, specializing in: 1040 tax form 1040 tax form 2014 1040 tax forms 20141040 tax forms 2014 form 1040 2014 tax 1040 2014 tax 1040 form 2014 tax form 1040 2014 tax form 1040 instructions 2014 tax forms 1040 federal 1040 form 1040 form 2014 1040 tax form form 1040 forms 1040 federal income form 1040 federal income tax 1040 federal income tax form 1040 federal income tax forms 1040 federal tax 1040 federal tax 1040 form tax form 1040 form 1040 2014 tax form 1040 for 2014 tax forms 1040 tax forms 1040 If there's one thing I hate more than anything else it's paperwork so when tax time came around I had to find someone to help me out or I was going to go crazy. After reading a few reviews online about J.M. Rose I felt confident in contacting him for assistance. My 2014 1040 was done in no time at all, would have no hesitation in recommending Jeff to anyone who needs a bit of help to wade through the red tape! Call us today on: (818) 992-5800 or (800) 992-5800 http://www.jmrose.com

Filling out IRS Schedule C for the 1040

Filling out IRS Schedule C for the 1040

For Self-employed, Independent Contractors (Sole Proprietorship), the "Schedule C" is your friend. You don't need a degree in Accounting. It's basic math - how much did your business make minus how much did your business spend equal net profit (or loss). Understanding the nuances of it will help you best keep track of your expenses so you can decrease your tax liability.

How to Do Your Taxes EXPLAINED!

How to Do Your Taxes EXPLAINED!

With Tax Day (April 15th) approaching, here is your (mostly) complete guide to federal income taxes, state income taxes, tax returns, IRS forms, IRS refunds, 1040EZs, 1099s, and other things you need to know in order to file your tax return. (TL;DR: don't worry, you got this.) Support How to Adult on Patreon at http://www.patreon.com/howtoadult Our other tax video, How to Do Self-Employment Taxes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGyEF5zTxJY "How to Adult" is a "life skills" edutainment channel executive produced by Hank Green and John Green. Subscribe for new videos every week! Tumblr: http://learnhowtoadult.tumblr.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/learnhowtoadult Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/learnhowtoadult VIDEO LINKS: IRS Free File: http://www.irs.gov/uac/Free-File:-Do-Your-Federal-Taxes-for-Free TurboTax: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FFIMBOA/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00FFIMBOA&linkCode=as2&tag=tmicmar-20 IRS W-4 Info: http://www.irs.gov/Individuals/International-Taxpayers/Withholding-Exemptions---Personal-Exemptions---Form-W-4 1040 Form(s): http://www.irs.gov/taxtopics/tc352.html Form 4868: http://www.irs.gov/uac/Form-4868,-Application-for-Automatic-Extension-of-Time-To-File-U.S.-Individual-Income-Tax-Return Schedule A: http://www.irs.gov/uac/Schedule-A-(Form-1040),-Itemized-Deductions 1099 Form(s): http://search.irs.gov/search?as_sitesearch=www.irs.gov/Help-%26-Resources/Tools-%26-FAQs/FAQs-for-Individuals&q=1099&output=xml_no_dtd&proxystylesheet=irs_portals_frontend&client=irs_portals_frontend&oe=UTF-8&ie=UTF-8&num=10&ud=1&exclude_apps=1&site=default_collection&numgm=5&requiredfields=-archive:1&&access=p&sort=date:D:L:d1&entqr=3&entqrm=3 National Association of Enrolled Agents: http://www.naea.org/ Co-created by: Emma Mills http://www.youtube.com/elmify Directed, Edited, Hosted and Co-written by: T. Michael (Mike) Martin http://www.youtube.com/tmikemartin (Mike is also a Young Adult novelist. His book, THE END GAMES, is available at all online booksellers, including Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0062201816/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0062201816&linkCode=as2&tag=tmicmar-20&linkId=CF4ULRBEW6LATV3C) Executive Produced by: Hank and John Green http://www.youtube.com/vlogbrothers Co-writer and Tax Adviser: Gary A. Hensley, MBA, EA (You can check out Gary's blog at http://taxsolutionsforwriters.com/) Notes on the W-4: Two general examples about "tweaking the W-4" are important enough to review here: (1) You may be single and claim 1 exemption but you have other significant investment income (such as dividends, interest, or capital gains) on which no federal income tax is withheld that will be added into your tax return at the end of the year. While 1 exemption might cover the tax due on your wages, it is doubtful it will cover your investment income, so folks in this position, will usually claim zero exemptions to have more income tax taken out to also help cover the investment income. (2) You are newly married, and you and your spouse update your W-4 to claim "married" with 1 exemption. This 1 exemption could be sufficient to cover each spouse's income but when the two incomes are combined on their joint tax return, it will "push" a portion of their income into a higher tax bracket (called the "marginal tax bracket") that the withholding tables do not factor in. Thus, the newly married couple could owe a significant income tax balance at the end of the year. This married couple should consider claiming zero exemptions on their W-4's and also the option to voluntarily "add" a fixed dollar amount to their federal withholding such as $25 per paycheck. They also have the option of checking the W-4 box that says, essentially, "I am married but want my withholding deducted as if I were single." The single withholding tax table takes a larger amount of income tax at every level of income earned. INFO ABOUT THE SCHEDULE A: If you itemize deductions such as mortgage interest, property taxes, contributions, union dues, and medical expenses, those items will be included on Schedule A. Itemized deductions will ONLY be used if that total exceeds the amount of your standard deduction for your filing status. The 2013 standard deduction for a single filer is $6,100 and for married, filing jointly it is $12,200. These amounts will go up slightly for 2014 returns. Each exemption (personal and dependent) is worth $3,900 in 2013. In short, this means that a single filer, in 2013, could have income up to $10,000 ($6,100 + $3,900) and owe no income tax (thus getting a full refund of federal income taxes withheld). To get the $3,900, the single filer must not be claimed as a dependent on someone else's return. INFO ON TAX EXTENSIONS (FORM 4868): http://www.irs.gov/uac/Newsroom/Can't-File-By-April-15,-Use-Free-File-to-Get-a-Six-Month-Extension-2013

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