Civil Engineer Corps Officer School

Civil Engineer Corps Officer School

CECOS is a rigorous 16 week course preparing aspiring Civil Engineer Corps officers for the harsh environments in which they will serve. Often compared to BUD/S, CECOS is known for its high attrition rates and unforgiving physical fitness program. This look at life with Squad 3, Basic Class 255 is just a taste of the challenges that await you if you choose to join the few and the proud: the Navy Civil Engineers! Go Seabees!

Civil Engineer Corps Celebrates 148 Years

Civil Engineer Corps Celebrates 148 Years

All Hands Update March 2, 2015 #2 The Navy's Civil Engineers Corps, or CEC, celebrates 148 years of designing, constructing and maintaining shore facilities for the Navy worldwide.

CIVIL ENGINEERS OF THE U.S. NAVY COMBAT ENGINEERS SEABEES 74412

CIVIL ENGINEERS OF THE U.S. NAVY  COMBAT ENGINEERS  SEABEES 74412

This 1950s U.S. Navy recruiting film shows the activities of the U.S. Civil Engineer Corps and the Naval Construction Battalions known as the Seabees. The film includes footage of Port Hueneme, home of the Seabees in this era, and shows the responsibilities of officers in the corps who supervise Navy base utilities including maintenance and operation of the sewer and electrical systems, transportation systems, building management and Navy housing, and more "public works" agenda items. At the 12 minute mark some of the more interesting aspects of engineer careers are shown, as the roles of a combat engineer are shown. This includes construction of air fields, oil lines, phone and communications systems, etc. Overseas work of Naval engineers in the world at large is also shown including at the Bureau of Yards and Docks in Washington, D.C. The Civil Engineer Corps (CEC) is a staff corps of the United States Navy. CEC officers are professional engineers and architects, acquisitions specialists and Seabee Combat Warfare Officers. They are responsible for executing and managing the planning, design, acquisition, construction, operation, and maintenance of the Navy's shore facilities. CEC ranks range from CWO2 to RADM. Civil engineers were employed by the Navy Department as early as 1827, when Mr. Loammi Baldwin was appointed to superintend the construction of dry docks at Boston and Norfolk. Prior to the passage of the Act of 2 March 1867 civil engineers were appointed by the Secretary, but under authority of that act they were to be commissioned by the President by and with the advice and consent of the Senate; they were appropriated for as part of the civil establishment at the several navy yards and stations under the control of the Bureau of Yards and Docks until 1870, when their pay was regulated by section 3 of the Act of 15 July of that year fixing the annual pay of officers of the Navy on the active list, and appropriations for their pay have been made since 1870 under the head of "Pay of the Navy". The discretionary authority given to the President by the Statute of 3 March 1871, to determine and fix the relative rank of civil engineers was not exercised until the 24th of February 1881, when relative rank was conferred upon them and fixed as follows: One with the relative rank of captain (CAPT), two with that of commander (CDR), three with that of lieutenant-commander (LCDR), and four with that of lieutenant (LT). The Navy Regulations for 1876 failed to list civil engineers among the staff officers of the Navy, and the uniform regulations for that year did not prescribe a uniform or a corps device for that class of officer. In 1881, after having had relative rank conferred upon them, civil engineers were instructed by Uniform Circular dated 24 August to wear the uniform of officers of the line with whom they had relative rank - omitting the star, which is a distinguishing mark of the line - with the following distinctive marks and devices instead of those worn by other officers: "The sleeve lace to be on light blue velvet. "Shoulder straps - border embroidered gold, body light blue cloth and the letters C.E. (Old English) embroidered in silver in the center. "The same letters to be similarly embroidered on frogs of epaulets." In 1905, two crossed silver sprigs, each composed of two live oak leaves and an acorn (sometimes called "Crossed Bananas"), was adopted as the insignia of the Civil Engineer Corps in lieu of the Old English letters C.E., and worn on the epaulets, shoulder straps and collar of the service coat. While the pattern of this corps device remained the same, uniform regulations issued in 1919 specified that it was to be embroidered in gold instead of silver and worn on the sleeve of frock, evening dress, and blue service coats, above the gold lace strips, and on shoulder marks for white service coat and overcoat. By these same regulations the light blue cloth worn under the sleeve strips, and worn on the shoulder marks since 1899, was abolished as a distinction of the corps, however is still present in the light blue color of the stripes worn by the enlisted sailors in the construction field in the pay grades of E-3 and below. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com

Beyond the Call: LT Ina Miranda-Vargas

Beyond the Call: LT Ina Miranda-Vargas

For the past six years, Lieutenant Ina Miranda-Vargas has had a fulfilling career in the U.S. Navy. Currently, she is the Facilities Engineer Acquisition Division Director for Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Public Works Department in Southeast New Orleans. Born in Puerto Rico and trained as an architect, LT Miranda-Vargas applied her skills soon after joining the U.S. Navy as a Civil Engineer helping manage the work of the Naval Construction Force, also known as the Seabees. In addition to projects within the Navy, the Seabees also provide humanitarian and disaster recovery assistance around the world. Miranda-Vargas serves as a mentor to others by thriving as a Latina in a historically male-dominated field and proves anything is achievable through hard work and dedication.

Beyond the Call: LCDR Ken Vargas

Beyond the Call: LCDR Ken Vargas

Ken Vargas leads a well-rounded life -- as a Native American, a motorcycle enthusiast, an experienced bow hunter and a Lieutenant Commander in the Navy Civil Engineer Corps. As one of the highest-ranking Native American Officers on Active Duty, LCDR Vargas is responsible for all on-base infrastructures in the southeast United States. For LCDR Vargas, the Navy has given him the chance to fulfill his childhood dream to be a warrior for his country.

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